ABACO SHELLS: 3 MORE FROM THE DELPHI CLUB COLLECTION


ABACO SHELLS: 3 MORE FROM THE DELPHI CLUB COLLECTION

I have recently featured some of the shells from the collection amassed at Delphi –  see SHELLS 1 and SHELLS 2. They are kept in vases or bowls for display and examination. They may not all come from the immediate vicinity, but they are all, for sure, from South Abaco. It’s time for some more.

PINK TRIVIA SHELL

 

LETTERED OLIVE  SHELL

  

COMMON SPIRULA  

For further details about Spirula(e), please see the comment box where Capt Rick Guest gives a lot of fascinating info about them and related marine cast-offs. You’ll also find out which are the real prize ones to look out for…

  A vignette of RH examining shells on the balcony at Delphi 

 

2 thoughts on “ABACO SHELLS: 3 MORE FROM THE DELPHI CLUB COLLECTION

  1. The Spirulla is a Buoyancy Compensator for a small, deep-water species of squid. The chambered shells float to the surface upon decomposition or predation. These are not uncommon on the windward beaches of the Bahamas. But a much rarer, and more beautiful find is the shell of the Paper Nautilus! There are 5 or 6 species, but the 7-8″ white, Argonauta argo is the most commonly found ashore. Of the 7 specimens which I have found, 3 were found whole in the stomachs of larger Dolphin,(Mahi). I know of others being found in Tunas. Many of these are brown or tan, and a more diminutive species, one being A.hians. For all practical purposes they are Octopods, living on or near the surface feeding upon most of the small sea-life around and in the rafts of Sargasum Weed. I have seen them when snorkeling under large rafts of weed hanging out under the densest areas. Never wanted to kill any for their shell though. I was, however able to keep a 7″ Argonauta argo alive in one of my research tanks for 24 hrs, but she was already compromised by having been washed ashore whilst laying her eggs inside the shell. Large specimens are female and die after attaching their eggs inside the shell. Also keep a sharp eye for the Purple Globe or Raft shells which are blown ashore in the winter months. They make rafts of mucous bubbles to float around on and they feed on Man-O-War, Porpita, and Velella tentacles. They exude a purple dye when handled, so be careful of your clothing. There are times when “Wind is your Friend!”

    • You are a mine of valuable info Rick, thanks for adding those comments – very helpful to me, and anyone else who has a look. I’d no idea that the spirula was part of a much lager whole. Interesting how much purple dye there is in sea-creatures – murex too. I put up a video of one being ‘milked’ for it. Specialists only, I think. RH

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