THE OCTOPUS: THERE’S NOTHING QUITE LIKE IT…


THE OCTOPUS: THERE’S NOTHING QUITE LIKE IT…

I’ve posted about the octopus a couple of times before. The first time was to explore the correct plural of the word ‘and related cephalopod mysteries’. You can see that HERE. More recently there was ‘Marine Bagpipes filled with Ink’, which you can see HERE. Both posts were really a way to show some of Melinda Riger’s stunning underwater photography, with an octopoidal theme. Now I have some more images for you, so I present some new photos of Octopi… erm, Octopodes… erm, Octopuses… Octopus ©Melinda Riger @G B Scuba Octopus 1:15 ©Melinda Riger @ G B Scuba Octopus 4

This octopus is having a sleep, disguised as a rockOctopus Sleeping ©Melinda Riger @ GB Scuba

Credits: All images courtesy of Melinda Riger of Grand Bahama Scuba

ABACO’S OWN ‘AERO-DRONE': GREAT AERIAL SHOTS BY ‘MR REES’


Hope Town, Abaco © David Rees

ABACO’S OWN ‘AERO-DRONE': GREAT AERIAL SHOTS BY ‘MR REES’

David Rees is well known for his excellent photography, not least because of his early adoption of a drone – a serious bit of  kit, not a toy ‘copter + camera – for capturing some wonderful aerial views of Abaco. Photos from the air can give so much more information about the setting of a particular location, and a drone can achieve a proximity and reveal details that an aeroplane shot cannot. I have seen some of David’s photographs in an exhibition at BPS, where they had been enlarged to make stunningly effective prints. David was kind enough to agree to my request to showcase a few of his photos, so I’ll let them do the talking…

HOPE TOWN / ELBOW CAYHope Town, Abaco ©David ReesHope Town Lighthouse, Abaco ©David Rees

TAHITI BEACHTahiti Beach, Abaco ©David Rees

CHEROKEECherokee, Abaco ©David Rees

The Long Dock, Cherokee – the longest wooden dock in the entire BahamasCherokee, Abaco - the Long Dock ©David Rees

CASUARINACasuarina, Abaco ©David Rees

TREASURE CAY

Voted one of the 10 loveliest beaches in the Caribbean by the National Geographic, no lessTreasure Cay, Abaco ©David ReesTreasure Cay, Abaco ©David Rees

MARSH HARBOURMarsh Harbour, Abaco ©David Rees

SCOTLAND CAYScotland Cay, Abaco ©David Rees

GREEN TURTLE CAYGreen Turtle Cay, Abaco ©David Rees

LITTLE HARBOURLittle Harbour, Abaco ©David Rees

All photos by David Rees, assisted by his amazing drone, with many thanks for use permission

THE SWIMMING PIGS OF ABACO (THEY CAN’T FLY YET…)


Pig at No Name Cay, Abaco (Tripadvisor on Pinterest)

THE SWIMMING PIGS OF ABACO (THEY CAN’T FLY YET…)

Many or most people with a Bahamian interest are familiar with the swimming feral pigs of the Exumas. They deservedly receive quite a lot of publicity, being (a) demonstrably porcine yet (b) inherently *adorbz* and (c) keen swimmers. A better kept secret is that there are swimming pigs on Abaco. Like these ones for example…

Swimming Pigs - Abaco, Bahamas (Vorobek / Wiki)

Where, you may ask. And the correct answer is that the location has no name though, as a logical paradox, it has one. No Name Cay is a name to conjure with. It is a small uninhabited Cay south of Green Turtle Cay, where pigs can swim and people can play with them. And did I mention the piglets?

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These great shots were posted by the indispensable Albury’s Ferry Services, without whom inter-island travel would be problematic, to say the least. They always have a good eye for a picture to post or a topical theme to run with, and this is no exception. Check out their FB page HERE.

Swimming Pigs of No Name Cay, Abaco (Albury's ferry Services, photographer unknown)Swimming Pigs of No Name Cay, Abaco (Albury's ferry Services, photographer unknown) Swimming Pigs of No Name Cay, Abaco (Albury's ferry Services, photographer unknown) Swimming Pigs of No Name Cay, Abaco (Albury's ferry Services, photographer unknown) Swimming Pigs of No Name Cay, Abaco (Albury's ferry Services, photographer unknown) Swimming Pigs of No Name Cay, Abaco (Albury's ferry Services, photographer unknown)

Once one gets started with these creatures, it’s hard to stop. Here  are 2 contented pigs instagramed and posted on FB recently with the caption “The piggies didn’t go hungry today…”. 

IMG_8601

Before I get completely carried away, here is a video posted by well-known Abaconian Dr Ralph, in which you can enjoy seeing some active swimming. ‘Porky stroke’, I guess.

Oooiiinkkkk! Sorry. Posted the wrong vid. Can’t correct until reunited with my computer…  See the pigs on land in the meanwhile…

Credits: Tripadvisor via Pinterest; Vorobek via Wiki; Albury’s ferry Services (photographers unknown, but cheers for these shots!); Alexa Pepe / Clinton Adderly (with apologies for assuming use permission as they are already ‘out there’ for anyone to see…); Dr Ralph for the video

ABACO, HERE WE COME – READY OR NOT…


Pelangi Store, eBay

ABACO, HERE WE COME – READY OR NOT…

The seats are chosen, the online check-in done, the die is cast… Mr and Mrs Harbour are on their way in the BA cattle truck. Laptops are to be abandoned for the duration, but I intend to post occasional things of interest by iPhone – a Kirtland’s warbler sighting, maybe (I wish!) or a fish that has stupidly managed to impale itself on my hook perhaps. Normal blogging service, if there is such a thing round here, will be resumed in due course… 

Fish on! Abaco Marls RH

FISH ON!

“THE BIRDS OF ABACO”

The book was launched at the Delphi Club exactly one year ago. We have been really delighted by the huge interest in it and the enthusiasm for it shown by so many people – residents, migratory residents and transients. There are still copies available*. If anyone would like a signed copy while we are at Delphi, I’m sure that can be arranged. I shall bring my special signing pen (it doesn’t smudge!) just in case…

flyer 2 copy

It’s possible – by which I mean highly likely, of course – that perceived ‘downtime’ on Abaco will in fact be quite busy. Fishing. Birding. Beaching. Pooling. Talking. Drinking. Eating. Sleeping. So apologies in advance if I’m not so responsive to comments, Facebook stuff and general soshul meeja matters. No offence meant and I hope none taken – I’ll try to keep up with it or play catch up in due course. Anyway, for those who kindly stick with Rolling Harbour or drop in occasionally, much appreciated… 

DELPHI SUNDOWNDelphi Club Abaco Portrait FV

*The price shown in the flyer for the book is now $150 to take account of the VAT. The publisher has absorbed the balance

Fishing sign pic: Pelangi Store, eBay. I ‘borrowed’ it, but who knows, they might make a sale as a result…

THE PECKING ORDER: FEEDER GREED ON ABACO


Black-faced Grassquits, Delphi, Abaco 2

THE PECKING ORDER: FEEDER GREED ON ABACO

At Delphi there are several feeders, with seeds for the garden birds in general, and sugar water feeders for the specialist hummingbirds. The seed feeders are the cause of a certain amount of species squabbling, with a pecking order based on size. Smaller birds tend to give way to larger, and either flutter down to the ground to pick up dropped seeds or fly off to the bushes until it’s safe to return.  The hummer feeders are also visited by birds with adaptive beaks to fit the tiny holes, such as bananaquits; and birds with long and probing tongues like the resident West Indian woodpeckers. The hummers tend to flit away until the intruders have flown off again.

BLACK-FACED GRASSQUITS

There’s no getting away from it, I’m afraid. BFGs are greedy little birds. Many would also call them dull, but personally I rather like the assertive colouring of the male and the subtle olive shades of the female (but that said I’d trade one in for a painted bunting without a second thought…). They are easily bullied out of the way by GABs (see below), although I have noticed that both species happily coexist on the ground under the feeders, where there is more space for them to pick up fallen seeds.

Black-faced Grassquits, Delphi, Abaco 4Black-faced Grassquits, Delphi, Abaco 3 Black-faced Grassquits, Delphi, Abaco 6

 GREATER ANTILLEAN BULLFINCH

These fine birds with their striking livery assume feeder priority. They are just as voracious as the BFGs, and get seriously stuck in. No other birds spoil their feasting. These are alpha seed guzzlers.Greater Antillean Bullfinch, Delphi, AbacoGreater Antillean Bullfinch, Delphi, Abaco

HEY YOU! GRASSQUIT! DON’T YOU DARE COME ANY CLOSER… MINE!Greater Antillean Bullfinch, Delphi, AbacoGreater Antillean Bullfinch, Delphi, Abaco

HUMMINGBIRD FEEDER RIVALS

BANANAQUIT

This bird had been sticking its thin, curved beak in to the tiny holes and drinking until I got a bead on it (with the camera). Annoyingly it then started to sip the spillage, so I missed the shot I really wanted… Meanwhile two Emeralds had retired to the bushed nearby, waiting for their chance at what was after all their own designated feeder.Bananaquit at Hummer feeder, Delphi, Abaco Bananaquit at Hummer feeder, Delphi, Abaco

This is a beak that can easily negotiate a little feeder holeBananaquit & palm, Delphi, Abaco, Bahamas 7

WEST INDIAN WOODPECKER

When Delphi’s resident woodpeckers decide to try out the hummer feeder, everyone keeps clear. Very meanly, the male takes precedence over the female, despite the fact that in the course of each year she rears two families, moving to the second nesting box to rearrange the furniture even before the chicks in the first box have flown. Nevertheless, she has to wait her turn… Note how the male manages to get his long tongue right into the small hole in the yellow flower…West Indian Woodpecker (male) at Hummer Feeder, Delphi, Abaco

Meanwhile, Mrs Woody politely waits her turn…West Indian Woodpecker (female) at Hummer Feeder, Delphi, Abaco

 All photos: RH

ROLLING HARBOUR, ABACO: LIFE’S A BEACH & THEN SOME…


Rolling Harbour Beach, Abaco1b

ROLLING HARBOUR, ABACO: LIFE’S A BEACH & THEN SOME…

Rolling Harbour (the geographical feature) is a gently curving one-mile white sand bay presided over by the Delphi Club, which sits on a 50 foot cliff behind the beach. There are rocks at either end, fish in the sea (including bonefish and, in the right conditions, permit), birds on the shore and shells on the sand. And that’s it… 

Rolling Harbour Beach, Abaco2bRolling Harbour Beach, Abaco3bRolling Harbour Beach, Abaco4bRolling Harbour Beach, Abaco5bRolling Harbour Beach, Abaco6bRolling Harbour Beach, Abaco7bRolling Harbour Beach, Abaco8b

And if anyone can explain the strange ribbed sky effect that seems to have appeared from nowhere when I posted these photos that I took last year (300dpi), then I’d be very grateful…