“A WHALE OF A YEAR”: 12 MONTHS FROM ROLLING HARBOUR ABACO


Whale Tailing, Bahamas (BMMRO)

“A WHALE OF A YEAR”: 12 MONTHS FROM ROLLING HARBOUR ABACO

 JANUARY

Red-winged Blackbird, Abaco

Red-winged Blackbird, Abaco Backcountry

FEBRUARY

French Angelfish (juv)

French Angelfish (juvenile), Bahamas

MARCH

Publication & Launch of “The Birds of Abaco”

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book-launch-1 Author signing copies, with Bahamas birding gurus Tony White, Bruce Hallett & Woody Bracey

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APRIL

20130106_Bahamas-Great Abaco_4846_Bahama Yellowthroat_Gerlinde Taurer copy

Bahama Yellowthroat, Abaco

MAY

Bananaquit & palm, Delphi, Abaco, Bahamas 7

Bananaquit, Delphi Club, Abaco, Bahamas

JUNE

Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, Abaco : WWT - RH 3

Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, Abaco – first recorded sighting

JULY

Octopus ©Melinda Riger @ Grand Bahama Scuba

Octopus, Bahamas

AUGUST 

Bobwhite pair 2.Abaco Bahamas.Tom Sheley cr

Bobwhite pair, Abaco, Bahamas

SEPTEMBER

Black-necked stilt Alex Hughes, Abaco

Black-necked Stilt, Abaco

OCTOBER

White-winged Dove, Abaco Bahamas - Tom Sheley

White-winged Dove, Abaco, Bahamas

NOVEMBER

Exploring Dan's Cave, Abaco

Exploring Dan’s Cave, Abaco

DECEMBER

Piping Plover, Abaco - Charmaine Albury

Piping Plover: a precious winter visitor to Man-o-War Cay, Abaco

All the best for 2015 to Rolling Harbour’s regular, occasional and random visitors

Credits: BMMRO, RH, Melinda Riger, Gerlinde Taurer, Tom Sheley, Alex Hughes, Brian Kakuk, Charmaine Albury

“ELEVEN PIPERS PIPING”: CUTE PLOVERS FOR CHRISTMAS…


Piping Plovers Conserve Wildlife Foundation NJ

Yay Mom! Apparently it’s something exciting called Christmas…

ELEVEN PIPERS PIPING“: CUTE PLOVERS FOR CHRISTMAS…

A Gorgeous Gallery of Ringed / Tagged PIPL by Danny Sauvageau

The numbers, positions, colours and numbering of the rings and tags pinpoints the precise origins of each bird. Note that some birds are ringed both above and below the ‘knee’. These markers have no effect on the daily lives of the birds, but are massively helpful in migration research. Danny’s photos are taken at ‘resting points’ in Florida where the birds pause as they migrate south for winter, many to Abaco and other Bahamas islands. Some birds shown below come from Canada, others from along the Eastern Seaboard of North America. Piping Plover, Florida (Danny Sauvageau 1) Piping Plover, Florida (Danny Sauvageau 2) Piping Plover, Florida (Danny Sauvageau 3)  Piping Plover, Florida (Danny Sauvageau 6) Piping Plover, Florida (Danny Sauvageau 5) Piping Plover, Florida (Danny Sauvageau 7) Piping Plover, Florida (Danny Sauvageau 9)

One Piper Piping…

Jerome Fischer / Xeno Canto

A Piper from Conserve Wildlife Foundation of NJ

This New Jersey conservation organisation is very closely involved with research into PIPL migration to their winter grounds. Two scientists, Todd Pover and Stephanie Egger, recently made their annual visit to Abaco to count the plovers and check for ID markers. At one remote location they found an amazing 88 birds. However, by the time they got to Delphi, the four Pipers that had been playing on the beach for a couple of weeks had moved off, unsettled by windy conditions. Piping Plover Conserve Wildlife Foundation NJ.JPG

An unringed Piper taken recently by Charmaine Albury on Man-o-War CayPiping Plover, Abaco - Charmaine Albury

The Epitome of Cute
Piping Plover chick (ex-FB, original lource unknown)

AND ONE EXTRA FOR LUCK!

Eco-friendly PIPL plush ‘stuffies’ from the fabulous UNREAL BIRDS. Check out their other species – the American Oystercatcher is irresistible. NB 20% of every sale goes to the Conserve Wildlife Foundation of NJ (see link above).

Piping Plover Plush Stuffies - Unreal Birds

Credits: Conserve Wildlife Foundation of NJ / ‘BirdsbyKim'; Danny Sauvageau; Char Albury; Unreal Birds; Cute chick from FB, unattributed – thanks, photographer!

COLOURFUL BUNTING FOR CHRISTMAS ON ABACO


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Painted Bunting, Abaco (Erik Gauger)

COLOURFUL BUNTING FOR CHRISTMAS ON ABACO

BUNTING  /ˈbʌntɪŋ/  (Noun)
[Yay! A Christmas gift of a puntastic avian / festive double-meaning]
  1. A small New World songbird of the cardinal subfamily
  2. Flags and other colourful festive decorations

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PAINTED BUNTINGPainted Bunting, Abaco Tara Lavallee

It’s hard to imagine a more Christmasy little bird than the Painted Bunting. Bright blue, red, green primary colours make for a spectacular small bird to grace any garden or feeder. The 2 birds above were featured in a detailed post on the species several months ago, with plenty of other great photos, HERE But there are other bunting species and close relations on Abaco that haven’t yet had a look-in on these pages. A common factor is the little fat beak and a great liking for seeds…

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INDIGO BUNTINGIndigo Bunting.BPS.Abaco Bahamas.Tom Sheley

Indigo Bunting male with 2 females going for the seeds, Bahama Palm ShoresIndigo Bunting, BPS, Abaco Ann Capling

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ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKRose-breasted Grosbeak PMRose-breasted Grosbeak, Delphi, Abaco (Caroline Stahala)

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SUMMER TANAGERSummer Tanager (m), Abaco Bruce Hallett

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SCARLET TANAGERScarlet Tanager, Abaco Woody Bracey

The birds above are all buntings or part of the wider bunting family. The definition is somewhat flexible and includes piranga and tanager species (and in the past the Western Spindalis, formerly the Stripe-headed Tanager). All were photographed on Abaco, mostly at the Delphi Club or Bahama Palm Shores. The photos below are a flagrant cheat. You’ll never see one of these on Abaco. They were taken by me a couple of years back in Central Park, NYC, made magic with snow and freezing air. Have a very happy and colourful Christmas!

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NORTHERN CARDINALRed Cardinal CP NYC 2Red Cardinal CP NYC 3

Credits: Erik Gauger, Tara Lavallee, Tom Sheley, Ann Capling, Caroline Stahala, Bruce Hallett, Woody Bracey, RH

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‘ANOTHER GOOD ONE': BRIDLED TERN ON ABACO


Bridled Tern, Abaco Bruce Hallett 2

 ‘ANOTHER GOOD ONE': BRIDLED TERN ON ABACO

Well, with a bit of digging into the naming of this tern species, I have discovered that the ‘bridled’ part of it apparently refers to the white band / collar at the back of its neck. This is puzzling because one would expect a ‘bridle’ to start at the mouth / beak and angle backwards. Like a horse. Like the conspicuous black line from the base of this tern’s beak sweeping back past its eyes and joining its black cap at the back. How wrong that assumption would be…

Far more exciting than the ‘bridle’ question is the origin of the Bridled Tern’s species name, Onychoprion anaethetus. Wondering about the medical-sounding word, I discovered via the excellent ARKIVE that the name derives from the Greek for ‘senseless’ or ‘stupid’, “a reference to the ease with which hungry sailors captured this bird“. So there you have it: not ‘aesthetically pleasing’ or similar compliment, but just plain dozy.

Bridled Tern, Abaco Bruce Hallett 3

The Bridled Tern is a fairly common summer resident on Abaco, where it breeds.  It is one of 12 tern species recorded on Abaco, the others being Sooty Tern, Least Tern, Gull-billed Tern, Caspian Tern, Black Tern, Roseate Tern, Common Tern, Arctic Tern, Forster’s Tern, Royal Tern and Sandwich Tern. 

These terns plunge-dive for fish, but will also take them from the surface. Unlike other terns – for example the Least Tern – they usually dive directly and not from a hover. When courting, the male will rather charmingly woo the female by offering her fish.

Bridled Tern, Abaco Bruce Hallett 1http://www.xeno-canto.org/sounds/uploaded/XFQFSNTWJY/XC197147-bridled%20tern.mp3 Eveny Louis / Xeno CantoBridled_Tern (Aviceda Wiki)

 Credits: Bruce Hallett (1,2,3), Aviceda (4), Xeno Canto (audio)

PEACOCK FLOUNDER: BAHAMAS REEF FISH (21)


  Peacock Flounder ©Melinda Riger @ GB Scuba

PEACOCK FLOUNDER: BAHAMAS REEF FISH (21)

PEACOCK FLOUNDER or PLATE FISH Bothus lunatus

I have briefly featured this fish before in the context of its extraordinary camouflage abilities; and also its interesting ocular arrangements. Time to give it another swim around, I think, with some additional photos that I have collected.

Peacock Flounder

Bothus lunatus is the Atlantic / Caribbean version of a species also found in the Pacific and Indian oceans. Adults may grow up to 18 inches long. The species is a ‘lefteye’ flounder, with both eyes on its left (top) side & its right side underneath.  However a baby flounder looks & swims like normal fish, with bilateral eyes. As it grows, the right eye gradually ‘moves’ round to the topside, and it becomes a flatfish.

Peacock Flounder

A flounder’s eyes can move independently of each other. One may look forwards, the other backwardsPeacock Flounder Eye ©Melinda Riger @ G B Scuba

‘NOW YOU SEE IT…’ CAMO-FISH

The Peacock Flounder has extraordinary  colour-changing powers, and can rapidly vary its background colour to make it closely resemble that of its surroundings. This enables it camouflage itself as it lies on the seabed. It can change coloration completely in between two to eight seconds.  

Four frames of the same fish taken a few minutes apart showing the ability of flounders to change colors to match the surroundings (Wiki)Peacock Flounder Brocken Inaglory

Check out these imitative patterns in Bahamas waters…Peacock Flounder (f) ©Melinda Riger @ Grand Bahama Scuba

Flower_flounder_in_Kona_wiki

There are two advantages to the ability to camouflage (‘cryptic coloration). One is obviously to avoid detection by predators. The other is to enable the flounder to ambush its meals. They feed primarily on small fishes, crabs and shrimps, lying concealed on the seabed and grabbing any unwary prey that ventures too close. They will even partially bury themselves in the sand, leaving just their eye-stalks keeping watch…Peacock Flounder ©Melinda Riger @ Grand Bahama Scuba

HOW CAN THEY POSSIBLY CHANGE COLOUR SO QUICKLY?

Scientists are still puzzling this out. In a conch shell, it seems the flounder can coordinate its amazing all-round vision with its hormones, instantly releasing certain pigments to its skin cells and suppressing other pigments to make the colour match. Not convinced? Then watch this short video and prepare to be impressed. 

Fred Riger of Grand Bahama Scuba, who kindly keeps a benign eye on my reef fish posts (he’s the expert), adds a third excellent reason for coloration changes: sex… “the male peacock flounder can, and does greatly intensify his colors, presumably to declare territory and attract females to his person. When doing this the males will also signal with the left pectoral fin, sticking it straight up and waving it around.” Maybe that is what is going on in the photo below – intensified, non-camouflage colours, and a raised fin…Peacock Flounder ©Melinda Riger@ G B Scuba

Peacock Flounder on a plate – Kim Rody Art983829_10154948988290716_6633206689277673329_n

Credits: Melinda Riger of Grand Bahama Scuba for almost all photos; wiki for 2 illustrative images

OVENBIRDS FOR CHRISTMAS ON ABACO (NB NOT ROAST TURKEY)


Ovenbird.Abaco Bahamas.Tom Sheley.2

OVENBIRDS FOR CHRISTMAS ON ABACO (NB NOT ROAST TURKEY)

The Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla) is a small winter-resident warbler with distinctive orange head feathers that can be raised into a crest.  I’m guessing this accomplishment is mainly used in the breeding season as a way to impress and attract a mate. Maybe when alarmed or excited at other times as well. Right now, with Christmas only ’12 sleeps’ away, they have become a visible presence on Abaco and the Cays despite their shyness and a general tendency to shuffle around in the undergrowth looking for insects and small snails. Ovenbird.Delphi Club.Abaco Bahamas.Tom Sheley.1

You may hardly be aware of these rather unassuming little birds, and as they rootle their way through the dead leaves under shrubs they can look quite dull. See one lit up by the morning sun, however, and you’ll see how pretty and richly marked they are.

Ovenbird, Abaco  Woody Bracey

The Ovenbird enjoys the taxonomic distinction of being the only bird of its genus in the warbler family Parulidae. It is a so-called ‘monotypic’ species. It was formerly lumped in with Waterthrushes, but was found to be genetically dissimilar so its new status was granted. 

Ovenbird.Bahama Palm Shores.Abaco Bahamas.Tom Sheley

The ovenbird is so named because it builds a domed nest (“oven”) with a side-entrance, constructed from foliage and vegetation. They tend to nest on the ground, making them vulnerable to predation. The species name for the ovenbird, Seiurus aurocapilla, has nothing to do with the nest shape, though. It derives from both Greek and Latin, and loosely means ‘shaking tail, golden haired’. No, nothing to do with Miley Cyrus either. Leave it.

Here are some recent shots taken by Charmaine Albury on Man-o-War Cay, showing the orange crest very clearly.

Ovenbird, M-o-W Abaco (Char Albury 3) Ovenbird, M-o-W Abaco (Char Albury 2) Ovenbird, M-o-W Abaco (Char Albury 1)

My plan to include audio of the ovenbird’s song and call has been temporarily thwarted by a glitch, but I’ll add them here when I have overcome the problem.Ovenbird, Abaco (Gerlinde Taurer)

Gauge the size of the bird against the pod it is standing on…Ovenbird, Abaco - Bruce Hallett

In this photo, you can see that the orange crest feathers are raisedOvenbird Seiurus aurocapilla (Cephas, wiki)

Credits: Tom Sheley, Woody Bracey, Charmaine Albury, Bruce Hallett, Gerlinde Taurer, Cephas / Wiki

THICK-BILLED VIREOS: ABACO’S ONLY PERMANENT RESIDENT VIREO


Thick-billed Vireo, Abaco 2 Tom Reed

THICK-BILLED VIREOS: ABACO’S ONLY PERMANENT RESIDENT VIREO

Hard to know why I haven’t got round to featuring these little vireos before. Unlike the other 7 vireo species found on Abaco seasonally or as transients, the Thick-billed Vireo Vireo crassirostris is an ever-present permanent resident of the coppice and scrub; and their unmistakeable repeating song can be heard almost everywhere. It was the first bird song I heard on Abaco, and therefore the TBV was the first bird I learned to ID. I’ve got quite a soft spot for them, really.Thick-billed Vireo, Abaco (Craig Nash)

Although TBVs are very easy to hear and track to a general area of coppice, I find actually seeing the bird creating the noise quite hard – let alone getting a clear camera shot. They always seem to be lurking several feet further away, deeper in the foliage, than the sound suggests. I’ve had some fun making TBV song iPhone recordings along the Delphi drive, practising the technique. If you want to know more about recording and converting to MP3 CLICK HERE.

One of my favourite images, from Gerlinde Taurer: a ‘shouty’ bird. We used it for ‘BIRDS OF ABACO‘.Thick-billed Vireo, Abaco  (Gerlinde Taurer 2)

I also love this perky little guy with a great beady-eyed pose taken by Bruce HallettThick-billed Vireo, Abaco (Bruce Hallett 2)

Here’s a clip of song, which I’m sure will be immediately familiar to Bahamians:

Paul Driver / Xeno Canto

Thick-billed Vireo, Abaco Bahamas.Tom Sheley

The main signifiers for this species, which in combination distinguish the TBV from the other vireo species on Abaco, are:

  • Two white wing bars
  • Yellow patch – usually quite prominent – between eye and beak
  • Thick bill – which immediately rules it out of being one of the 37 warbler species on Abaco…

Text book TBVThick-billed Vireo, Abaco (Becky Marvil 2).jpg

There are marked colour variations in the species according to maturity, season and to an extent gender (though m & f are quite similar). Here’s one that is causing wing-bar confusion by only showing traces. It also has quite dark upper parts.

Thick-billed Vireo, Abaco (Alex Hughes)

This is a very yellow TBVThick-billed Vireo, Abaco (Bruce Hallett 1)Whereas this one has rather anaemic colorationThick-billed Vireo, Abaco Bahamas .Tom SheleyFinally, this pretty TBV is very delicately markedThick-billed Vireo, Abaco (Tony Hepburn)

RELATED POSTS

BLACK-WHISKERED VIREO

PHILADELPHIA VIREO

Credits: Tom Reed (1), Craig Nash (2), Gerlinde Taurer (3), Bruce Hallett (4, 8), Tom Sheley (5, 9), Becky Marvil (6), Alex Hughes (7), Tony Hepburn (10); Paul Driver / Xeno Canto