CAN A PELICAN? THE HELICAN!


A taster for a future post about Brown Pelicans when I have a more reliable internet connection than Abaco’s rather intermittent service… These two birds were taken a few days ago on the jetty at Sandy Point, Abaco. In due course there’ll be more about these astonishing birds, which were plunge-diving off the jetty for fish.Pelican Sandy Point AbacoPelican Sandy Point Abaco 3Pelican Sandy Point Abaco 2

A GREAT BLUE HERON AT SANDY POINT, ABACO


When I get a better internet connection I have some great bird posts planned. Until then it has to be single images on my iph@ne. Here’s one from a couple of days back … NEW! Originally mis-ID – there was some general confusion about that. Thanks, Brigitte on Tilloo for ringing the alarm bell. My bad! Internet has temporarily improved, here’s the full-size rather than iph@ne image, with more to follow soon…Great Blue Heron Close-up, Sandy Point Abaco

AN OSPREY ON THE ABACO MARLS


Osprey - Abaco Marls 3

AN OSPREY ON THE ABACO MARLS

Anglers are not the only creatures out fishing on the Marls. Herons and egrets of several sorts live in the massive area of mangrove swamp, shallow sea and sandy spits that make up the prime bonefishing grounds of Abaco. Yesterday, we were lucky enough to be joined by an osprey. Hooking my ‘Delphi Daddy’ safely into a rod ring, I grabbed a camera and took some shots. These aren’t that great because (a) I normally only take a small cheap camera out fishing (b) the bird was some away off and (c ) my image qualities are variable… These aren’t really worth clicking to enlarge, but I’m pleased to have got some ‘action shots’ of this wonderful bird.

Osprey - Abaco Marls 2Osprey - Abaco Marls 1Osprey - Abaco Marls 4

IDENTITY CRISIS ON ABACO:WEST INDIAN WOODPECKERS OR HUMMINGBIRDS?


800px-West_Indian_Woodpecker_(Melanerpes_superciliaris)IDENTITY CRISIS ON ABACO:WEST INDIAN WOODPECKERS OR HUMMINGBIRDS?

The hummingbirds round here – Cuban Emeralds and occasional Bahama Woodstars – have feeders full of sugar water to keep them sweet. These are also enjoyed by other birds with suitable beaks or tongues able to get to the liquid through tiny holes.  Bananaquits, for example. Now the resident woodpeckers have got in on the act. Our arrival at Delphi coincides with the start of insistent tapping noises from inside the 2 nesting boxes that were put up to divert the woodpeckers from wrecking the wooden roof eaves. They are carrying out annual routine maintenance, putting up new bookshelves etc before settling down to produce their first brood of the year. And they have now discovered how to get a sugar-rush to keep up their energies. 

TRYING TO INSERT THE BEAK IS NOT A GOOD METHODWest Indian Woodpecker Abaco 4West Indian Woodpecker Abaco 2

USING A LONG TONGUE IS IDEALWest Indian Woodpecker Abaco 5West Indian Woodpecker Abaco 1

MEANWHILE THE FEMALE HAS TO WAIT FOR HER TURN…West Indian Woodpecker Abaco 3

“I MUST FLY”: GONE TO ABACO. BACK SOMETIME.


“I MUST FLY”: GONE TO ABACO. BACK SOMETIME.

UPDATES AS & WHEN

BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHERBlue-gray Gnatcatcher Delphi Club Abaco Bahamas.Tom Sheley

HIS ‘N’ HERS RODS ON THE BEACH AT DELPHIOn the beach... Delphi Club, Abaco

ZEBRA HELICONIAN BUTTERFLYZebra Heliconian Abaco Charlie Skinner

QUEEN ANGELFISHQueen Angelfish © Melinda Riger @ G B Scuba

REFRESHMENT OF CHOICE…Kalik by Kaitlyn Blair (F:B)Relax Notice, Lubbers CayShark Cartoon

Photos: Tom Sheley, RH, Charlie Skinner, Melinda, Kaitlyn Blair on FB, RH

FIVE ELEGANT GULLS AND A SMART BUOY: BIRDS OF ABACO


Herring Gull (ad, nb) BH

FIVE ELEGANT GULLS AND A SMART BUOY: BIRDS OF ABACO

There are 8 gull species recorded on Abaco. The 5 species shown here all feature in the new ‘Delphi Club Guide to the Birds of Abaco’.  The others are the occasional vagrants Black-legged Kittiwake and Black-headed Gull;  and the rare winter visitor Great Black-backed Gull.  We do in fact have a Black-headed Gull in the archive (in winter plumage), but it was taken on New Providence and wasn’t eligible for inclusion in a book of Abaco birds. Even as a cheat.

Black-headed Gull (winter plumage) NPBlack-headed Gull (adult, winter plumage) WB

HERRING GULL (& header image) (WR 2)herring-gull-5Herring Gull WB P1000298 small

BONAPARTE’S GULL (WR 4)Bonaparte's Gull BHBonaparte's Gull BH (Ad NB) SMALL

LAUGHING GULL  (PR B 1)Laughing Gull4_-NH laughing-gulls2 EG

LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL (WR 2)Lesser Black-backed Gull (ad, nb) BH Lesser Black-backed Gull WB

RING-BILLED GULL (WR 1)Ring-billed Gull (Nina Henry : DCB)Ring-billed Gull BH (ad nb)

NOAA ‘SMART BUOY’ (Chesapeake Bay)*NOAA Chesapeake Bay SmartbuoyPhoto Credits: Bruce Hallett, Woody Bracey, Nina Henry, RH, + NOAA

Abaco Bird Code jpg

* Correct. The image is included solely to enable a laboured & old hat pun on ‘girls & boys’.

“SEVEN GOOD TERNS DESERVE AN AUTHOR”: BIRDS OF ABACO


Royal Terns Abaco (2) 4

“SEVEN GOOD TERNS DESERVE AN AUTHOR”: BIRDS OF ABACO

A total of 12 tern species have been recorded on Abaco and in Abaco waters. Ever. Some are permanently resident, some are winter visitors, some arrive for the summer and one or two – for example the Arctic Tern – are one-off or vanishingly rare sightings. A few are commonplace, some you may see if you know where to look or are lucky, some would not be worth making a special trip to Abaco to find…

Here are 7 tern species that all feature in the newly published “Delphi Club Guide to the Birds of Abaco”. A cunning code devised by Bahamas ornithologist Tony White tells you when they are around (PR, WR, SR = permanent, winter, summer resident; TR means transient) and the likelihood of seeing one at the appropriate time (1 = very likely to 5 = next to no chance). B means ‘breeds on Abaco’.

The header picture shows a line up of Royal Terns perched characteristically facing the breeze on a dead tree far out on the Marls. I took it while we were out bonefishing, and our guide Ishi very tolerantly poled nearer to the birds so I could get a better shot at them with the sun behind me. The ones shown are in an intermediate stage between non-breeding plumage and full breeding plumage, when the ‘caps’ are black. One (shown below) had the full black cap.

BRIDLED TERN (SR B 2)Bridled Tern, Bruce Hallett

CASPIAN TERN (TR 4)Caspian Tern Woody Bracey

GULL-BILLED TERN (SR 3)Gull-billed Tern Alex Hughes

ROSEATE TERN (SR B 2)Roseate Tern Woody Bracey

ROYAL TERN (PR 1)Royal Terns RH / KS

SANDWICH TERN (SR 4)Sandwich Tern Woody Bracey

LEAST TERN (SR B 1)Least Tern Tony Hepburn

The other 5 species recorded are: Sooty Tern, Black tern, Common Tern, Arctic Tern and Forster’s Tern

Photo Credits: Bruce Hallett, Woody Bracey, Alex Hughes, RH

Abaco Bird Code jpg