“ABACO ART” aka SAND & WATER AT CASUARINA…


Ferry Wake Abaco

“ABACO ART” aka SAND & WATER AT CASUARINA…

What is art? *loud reader yawn* I suspect we all know it when we see it; and know instinctively when something violently overpraised and vastly overhyped has failed to shake off a strong impression of ‘utter tosh’, ‘money for old rope’ or ‘one-trick pony’. We all have inbuilt settings for “I may not know much about art but I know what I like” and “a child of 3 could have done that”. It’s just that our individual settings are all different. But secretly (go on, admit it) we all know that ours are the correct and appropriate ones…

With that in mind here are some sandy puddles I photographed on glorious day when we were idly looking for SAND DOLLARS on a sand bar at Casuarina. I don’t suppose they amount to anything, but I’ll soon know from my stats what people think of these abstract patterns. And I have a powerful delete button if this post bombs… If not I see scope here for a line of T-shirts, mugs, key rings  stickers and … mouse mats? Does anyone still use those?Sand & Water Abstacts on Abaco 15 Sand & Water Abstacts on Abaco 14 Sand & Water Abstacts on Abaco 13 Sand & Water Abstacts on Abaco 12 Sand & Water Abstacts on Abaco 11 Sand & Water Abstacts on Abaco 10 Sand & Water Abstacts on Abaco 9 Sand & Water Abstacts on Abaco 7 Sand & Water Abstacts on Abaco 6 Sand & Water Abstacts on Abaco 5 Sand & Water Abstacts on Abaco 4 Sand & Water Abstacts on Abaco 3 Sand & Water Abstacts on Abaco 2 Sand & Water Abstacts on Abaco 1[The header picture is the wake of the ferry from Hope Town to Marsh Harbour. Or as I prefer to call it, "Aquatextural Modifications III"]

SEA URCHINS & SEA BISCUITS – BEACHCOMBING TREASURES ON ABACO


SEA URCHINS & SEA BISCUITS – BEACHCOMBING TREASURES ON ABACO 

It’s time we had some more shells and other beach treasures on these pages. In the absence of star Abaco beachcomber and blog-contributor KASIA I have taken a closer look at the Delphi Club collection. This has been casually accumulated by the Club, its members and guests during the past 3 years whenever a good specimen has been encountered, and is displayed in the Great Room. The first items to catch my eye were the ECHINODERMS, a family that includes sea urchins, sand dollars, sea biscuits and star fish. Their sun-bleached tests are often found, though in my limited experience the larger they are, the rarer.  The link above is to the Wiki-blurb, which has the unpromisingly daunting heading  “This article may be too technical for most readers to understand…”. Now there’s a challenge!

First up is a very large SEA URCHIN, a thing of great delicacy and fragility that weighs next to nothing. I have never seen a bigger one. Looking at the fine detail, it is hard to believe that such perfection of symmetry and intricacy can exist in a creature so very painful to tread on. 

This SEA URCHIN is smaller, with more prominent nodules and a much more random pattern – reminiscent of a cartoon of some distant white planet. It has cast a fine knobbly shadow.

SEA BISCUITS have similar five-way symmetry to their first cousins SAND DOLLARS but are generally pebble-shaped rather than disc-shaped. I have included 2 close-ups to show the fine details of the pattern – almost like lace-work

This SEA BISCUIT is a different type, with the 5 radials reaching right round it. For some reason it only has 4 and not 5 small holes (as one might expect) at the centre. Unlike SAND DOLLARS they tend to be more oblong than round.

MUREX & TRITON SHELL COLLECTING ON ABACO WITH KASIA


PAGE REWRITE IN PROGRESS

MUREX (MURICIDAE) & TRITONS (RANELLIDAE) 

1. MUREX SHELLS (Muricidae)

This is a vast family of shells worldwide, with many subspecies, each of which has many regional variations. Or even variations of the same subspecies on the same beach. Many have beautiful delicate spines or intricate shapes and elaborate patterns, like the pacific one shown

These molluscs are described as ‘voracious rock scavengers’ and exhibit uninhibited psychopathic tendencies. If you have a nervous disposition, stop reading here; Sam Peckinpah missed a great film collaboration with Jacques Cousteau with these vicious little creatures

10 ESSENTIAL YET GRISLY MUREX FACTS

  • Murex are highly carnivorous with rasping teeth, and drilling equipment for boring into the shells of their prey
  • A determined Murex may take up to 5 days to drill into its prey
  • Murex also use their foot to smother prey, or to crush it by using suction power
  • They eat clams by hoovering them up with their foot and smashing them on rocks to get at the occupant
  • They happily eat sea-floor carrion and sea-kill
  • Murex act in packs to carry out raids on unsuspecting beds of clams, which they feast on avidly
  • They are sexually wanton. Females store sperm from different males for many months, eventually producing embryos with different dads (I’m not making this up. I would like to have done so)
  • Cannibalism occurs. The kids are equally prone to extreme delinquency and are happy to eat each other when peckish
  • Some species of murex secrete a fluid that is believed to be used to drug their prey into paralysis
  • That same fluid (Murex / Mucus) is also used as a dye, ‘Tyrian’ or ‘Royal’ Purple, which can be ‘milked’ from a living murex (the Aztecs & Phoenicians did this). I’ll pass on that

NEW: VIDEO of how to obtain dye from a Murex

 KASIA’S BEACHCOMBED ABACO MUREX SKELETON

TWO MUREX SHELLS OF MINE (NOT FROM ABACO) FOR COMPARISON  DETAIL OF COLOUR & SHINE

2. TRITON SHELLS (RANELLIDAE)

KASIA’S TRITON TROPHY FROM CASUARINA, ABACO

Here is another shell from Kasia’s beachcombing in the Casuarina Point area on Abaco. I’ve never seen one like this. I thought it was a TROPHON, a variety of the huge MUREX family. As I wrote, there are more than 30 types of trophon world-wide, many with a similar configuration, though I hadn’t managed to find one with a similar colouring and shell growth-pattern yet. I invited  confirmation or correction, which Colin Redfern kindly provided. It is in fact a fine example of a…

 

DOG-HEAD TRITON Cymatium cynocephalum

ANGULAR TRITON Cymatium femorale                                                                                A different sort of triton found by Kasia