MANATEES: PICTURE PERFECT ON ABACO (4)


MANATEES: PICTURE PERECT ON ABACO (4)

MANATEE APPRECIATION DAY 2020West Indian Manatee, Abaco, Bahamas (Charlotte Dunn / BMMRO)

Mrs RH and I are sticking to self-isolation right now (we are fine, but thank you for asking). However I am already breaking my current self-imposed ‘single-picture-and-not-much-writing’ regime with today’s creature feature. The excuse? It is of course the last Wednesday in March and as everyone must know it is Manatee Appreciation Day.

Anyone can (and indeed should) appreciate manatees anywhere at any time, and their contemplation is a way to lift the spirits. They were first found in Abaco waters about a dozen years ago. BMMRO reported their movements and the ongoing research. Later, Bahamian locals enthusiastically followed the lives of Gina, Rita, Georgie, Randy & co; and the calves such as JJ and Sayle (winning name in a public competition). Citizen scientist reports were invaluable to the research. Unsurprisingly, since Hurricane Dorian reports have greatly reduced. Manatees may well still be around but even now, 6 months later, trichechi sightings are sporadic. There are other concerns, after all.

West Indian Manatee, Abaco, Bahamas (Charlotte Dunn / BMMRO)

Manatees love the camera and, Madonna-like, are often pleased to ‘strike the pose’. Of a sort.

West Indian Manatee, Abaco, Bahamas (Charlotte Dunn / BMMRO)

West Indian Manatee, Abaco, Bahamas (Charlotte Dunn / BMMRO)

Today the Marine Conservation Society (MCS) showed their appreciation for manatees with a superb image and an excellent set of Manatee Facts that I recommend to anyone who has read this far. For example, recent broadcasts and news articles have featured the importance of seagrass. You will see that it is the primary diet of manatees. 

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Happy #ManateeAppreciationDay! ☺️ We have a great photo-feature of these amazing animals in the Spring issue of our magazine coming to all members in the next few days but whilst you wait, here are some fun facts about them: ⠀ ⠀ 💙The manatee, also known as a 'sea cow', is a large marine mammal with an egg-shaped head, flippers and a flat tail. ⠀ 💙Manatees range in size from 8 to 13 feet (2.4 to 4 meters) and can weigh 440 to 1,300 lbs. (200 to 590 kilograms). ⠀ 💙Although they may seem like cumbersome creatures, manatees can swim quickly and gracefully.They have strong tails that power their swimming and usually swim about 5 mph but they can swim up to 15 mph (24 km/h) in short bursts ⠀ 💙There are three species of manatee: the Amazonian manatee, the West Indian/American manatee and the African manatee. ⠀ 💙Manatees often swim alone or in pairs. If manatees are seen in a group (called an aggregation), it is either a mating herd or an informal meeting of the species simply sharing a warm area that has a large food supply. ⠀ 💙Manatees are herbivores. At sea, they tend to prefer sea grasses. When they live in rivers, they consume freshwater vegetation. Manatees also eat algae. It's reported that a manatee can eat a tenth of its own weight in 24 hours! ⠀ 💙The IUCN's Red List of Threatened Species lists all manatees as vulnerable or endangered and facing a high risk of extinction. ⠀ Manatees are thought to have evolved from four-legged land mammals more than 60 million years ago. Except for the Amazonian manatee, their paddlelike flippers have vestigial toenails — a remnant of the claws they had when they lived on land. ⠀ 💙Manatees' eyes are small, but their eyesight is good. They have a special membrane that can be drawn across the eyeball for protection. ⠀ 💙Manatees don't always need to breathe. As they swim, they poke their nose up above the water's surface to catch a few breaths every few minutes. If they are simply resting, they can stay under the water for 15 minutes without taking a breath ⠀ ⠀ #marinemammal #marineconservation #marnebiology #marinelife #oceanlife #oceanindoors #manatee ⠀ ⠀

A post shared by Marine Conservation Society (@mcs_uk) on

Credits: Photos #1 – #4 Charlotte Dunn / Bahamas Marine Mammal Research Organisation (BMMRO) and #5 Caine Delacy / BMMRO; MCS UK

MCS links: https://www.mcsuk.org; https://www.facebook.com/mcsuk/

Gina with her calf SayleWest Indian Manatee, Abaco, Bahamas (Caine Delacy / BMMRO)

5 thoughts on “MANATEES: PICTURE PERFECT ON ABACO (4)

  1. Thank you for these wonderful photos, I was just at Manatee bay in Florida to see them. There were a couple dozen swimming around. You can only see them from the top of the water. But it was a beautiful experience. Love the photos.

    Liked by 1 person

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