MANATEES: PICTURE PERFECT ON ABACO (4)


MANATEES: PICTURE PERECT ON ABACO (4)

MANATEE APPRECIATION DAY 2020West Indian Manatee, Abaco, Bahamas (Charlotte Dunn / BMMRO)

Mrs RH and I are sticking to self-isolation right now (we are fine, but thank you for asking). However I am already breaking my current self-imposed ‘single-picture-and-not-much-writing’ regime with today’s creature feature. The excuse? It is of course the last Wednesday in March and as everyone must know it is Manatee Appreciation Day.

Anyone can (and indeed should) appreciate manatees anywhere at any time, and their contemplation is a way to lift the spirits. They were first found in Abaco waters about a dozen years ago. BMMRO reported their movements and the ongoing research. Later, Bahamian locals enthusiastically followed the lives of Gina, Rita, Georgie, Randy & co; and the calves such as JJ and Sayle (winning name in a public competition). Citizen scientist reports were invaluable to the research. Unsurprisingly, since Hurricane Dorian reports have greatly reduced. Manatees may well still be around but even now, 6 months later, trichechi sightings are sporadic. There are other concerns, after all.

West Indian Manatee, Abaco, Bahamas (Charlotte Dunn / BMMRO)

Manatees love the camera and, Madonna-like, are often pleased to ‘strike the pose’. Of a sort.

West Indian Manatee, Abaco, Bahamas (Charlotte Dunn / BMMRO)

West Indian Manatee, Abaco, Bahamas (Charlotte Dunn / BMMRO)

Today the Marine Conservation Society (MCS) showed their appreciation for manatees with a superb image and an excellent set of Manatee Facts that I recommend to anyone who has read this far. For example, recent broadcasts and news articles have featured the importance of seagrass. You will see that it is the primary diet of manatees. 

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Happy #ManateeAppreciationDay! ☺️ We have a great photo-feature of these amazing animals in the Spring issue of our magazine coming to all members in the next few days but whilst you wait, here are some fun facts about them: ⠀ ⠀ 💙The manatee, also known as a 'sea cow', is a large marine mammal with an egg-shaped head, flippers and a flat tail. ⠀ 💙Manatees range in size from 8 to 13 feet (2.4 to 4 meters) and can weigh 440 to 1,300 lbs. (200 to 590 kilograms). ⠀ 💙Although they may seem like cumbersome creatures, manatees can swim quickly and gracefully.They have strong tails that power their swimming and usually swim about 5 mph but they can swim up to 15 mph (24 km/h) in short bursts ⠀ 💙There are three species of manatee: the Amazonian manatee, the West Indian/American manatee and the African manatee. ⠀ 💙Manatees often swim alone or in pairs. If manatees are seen in a group (called an aggregation), it is either a mating herd or an informal meeting of the species simply sharing a warm area that has a large food supply. ⠀ 💙Manatees are herbivores. At sea, they tend to prefer sea grasses. When they live in rivers, they consume freshwater vegetation. Manatees also eat algae. It's reported that a manatee can eat a tenth of its own weight in 24 hours! ⠀ 💙The IUCN's Red List of Threatened Species lists all manatees as vulnerable or endangered and facing a high risk of extinction. ⠀ Manatees are thought to have evolved from four-legged land mammals more than 60 million years ago. Except for the Amazonian manatee, their paddlelike flippers have vestigial toenails — a remnant of the claws they had when they lived on land. ⠀ 💙Manatees' eyes are small, but their eyesight is good. They have a special membrane that can be drawn across the eyeball for protection. ⠀ 💙Manatees don't always need to breathe. As they swim, they poke their nose up above the water's surface to catch a few breaths every few minutes. If they are simply resting, they can stay under the water for 15 minutes without taking a breath ⠀ ⠀ #marinemammal #marineconservation #marnebiology #marinelife #oceanlife #oceanindoors #manatee ⠀ ⠀

A post shared by Marine Conservation Society (@mcs_uk) on

Credits: Photos #1 – #4 Charlotte Dunn / Bahamas Marine Mammal Research Organisation (BMMRO) and #5 Caine Delacy / BMMRO; MCS UK

MCS links: https://www.mcsuk.org; https://www.facebook.com/mcsuk/

Gina with her calf SayleWest Indian Manatee, Abaco, Bahamas (Caine Delacy / BMMRO)

DOLPHINS IN THE SEA OF ABACO, BAHAMAS


DOLPHINS IN THE SEA OF ABACO, BAHAMAS (BMMRO)

Dolphin mother and newborn calf

DOLPHINS IN THE SEA OF ABACO, BAHAMAS

The bottlenose dolphin photos here, taken during a recent BMMRO dolphin research project in the Sea of Abaco, are of great significance. Six months after Hurricane Dorian smashed the life out of Abaco, the island is still in the early stages of recovery – to the extent that recovery is possible when the main (only) town has been pulverised to rubble and the island’s infrastructure wrecked. Good news is prized.

DOLPHINS IN THE SEA OF ABACO, BAHAMAS (BMMRO)

Amidst the human cost of Dorian to the Abaco community, people have found some consolation in the natural world around them. The return of birdsong. The bright flashes of the unique parrots flying overhead. Shorebirds returning to the beaches from wherever they found for cover. Curly-tail lizards sunning themselves. And on water, sightings of turtles, rays and dolphins to spread some cheer. Some huge bonefish are being caught (and released) too.

DOLPHINS IN THE SEA OF ABACO, BAHAMAS (BMMRO)

The Bahamas Marine Mammal Research Organisation (BMMRO) has its HQ at Sandy Point. During the past months, life there has been busy. A long-term underwater acoustic research project is in progress, for example. The effects of the hurricane on the marine mammals in Abaco waters – whales , dolphins and manatees – has been a cause of great concern. A drop in the dolphin population in the Sea of Abaco had been noted a few months ago, so a second assessment of the area has just been carried out.

DOLPHINS IN THE SEA OF ABACO, BAHAMAS (BMMRO)

Playtime in the Sea of Abaco

GOOD NEWS FOR DOLPHINS

Scientists Diane Claridge and Charlotte Dunn obtained positive results. During the assessment,  they encountered 18 individual dolphins. The encouraging observations included:

  • The wonderful mother and newborn calf in the header image – a great sign of hope
  • Some dolphins first recorded – amazingly – in 1992
  • Dolphins in areas not used for years, probably due to recent reduced boat traffic
  • Familiar dolphin behaviours such as wave-surfing and group socialising
DOLPHINS IN THE SEA OF ABACO, BAHAMAS (BMMRO)

Ragged dorsal fin patterns enable easy ID

If you wonder how researchers can be so sure about the ID of the animals they see, check out the dorsal fins in some images here. Individual dolphins have unique patterns, markings (#2) and in particular fin damage that is readily identifiable. Seen close to, these are obvious. At a longer distance, binoculars are needed. Photos of each animal are also taken to be analysed in the lab. Sound recordings may be taken: distinctive individual voice patterns are analysed to assist ID. All of this can be compared against the BMMRO database. That is how dolphins first recorded in 1992 can be identified with such certainty now.

Credits: Charlotte Dunn (photos) and Diane Claridge, BMMRO; the dolphins for research cooperation 

If you would like to know more about the work of BMMRO and its research, click the logo above

DOLPHINS IN THE SEA OF ABACO, BAHAMAS (BMMRO)

SEAL: THE REAL DEAL


Harbour Seal, Gairloch Scotland (Keith Salvesen / Rolling Harbour)

As Abaco starts to rebuild from the unimagined severity of its destruction, it’s not a great moment for discursive writing about the astonishing richness of wildlife there, both above and below the sea. So here’s a photo of a Harbour Seal that I took this afternoon. If it gives you something to smile about, I’d be very glad. RH

DOLPHINS IN THE SEA OF ABACO: PLAYTIME


Dolphins, Sea of Abaco Bahamas (BMMRO / Charlotte Dunn / Keith Salvesen)

DOLPHINS IN THE SEA OF ABACO: PLAYTIME

Earlier this year, the team at Friends of the Environment in Marsh Harbour Abaco, in conjunction with BMMRO (Bahamas Marine Mammal Research Organisation), arranged a fundraising trip to look for whales and dolphins. On both counts, the guests’ hopes and expectations were amply fulfilled – in fact, almost certainly exceeded.

Dolphins, Sea of Abaco Bahamas (BMMRO / Charlotte Dunn / Keith Salvesen)

Where there is a single dolphin, there will almost invariably be others – and so it proved. The group of bottlenose dolphins turned out to be in a very playful mode, living up to their reputation as delightful, inquisitive, entertainers.

Dolphins, Sea of Abaco Bahamas (BMMRO / Charlotte Dunn / Keith Salvesen)

One of the dolphins turned out to be a young 3rd generation animal from the same family, recently weaned. The BMMRO has a large photographic library of dolphins and whales, collected over many years. In the photo above, you’ll see that the dorsal fin of the nearest one is ragged, especially near the top. This is the primary method by which individual animals are recorded to assist with subsequent identification in the field (= water) or back at base in Sandy Point by means of the photo archive.

Dolphins, Sea of Abaco Bahamas (BMMRO / Charlotte Dunn / Keith Salvesen)

The trip was perfected when a young female sperm whale came close to the boat… and then rolled onto her side, flipper up, to get a good look at the boat and its human contents. A wonderful experience for all those on board.

Dolphins, Sea of Abaco Bahamas (BMMRO / Charlotte Dunn / Keith Salvesen)

Credits: BMMRO / Charlotte Dunn; Friends of the Environment

Dolphins, Sea of Abaco Bahamas (BMMRO / Charlotte Dunn / Keith Salvesen)