FEEDER BIRDS AT THE DELPHI CLUB, ABACO


Delphi Club, Rolling Harbour, Abaco aerial

FEEDER BIRDS AT THE DELPHI CLUB, ABACO

The compilation of The Delphi Club Guide to THE BIRDS OF ABACO involved making a few rules and sticking to them. For example, the avian images in the book – and there are a great many –  had to be of birds actually photographed on Abaco or in Abaco waters. Gorgeous pictures from Grand Bahama or New Providence were ruthlessly excluded, however painful it was to do. Some wonderful spoonbill photos taken in Nassau stayed in the ‘Not Use’ folder. The temptation to slip in an non-Abaco whimbrel to fill a whimbrel-shaped space among the shorebirds had to be resisted – even though at the time the last recorded sighting of one on Abaco (no photo) was in 2000…

Bananaquit 2, Delphi, Abaco (Keith Salvesen)

Another important restriction was the stipulation that we would only use birds that had been photographed in their natural surroundings, defined as being a place where a particular species might naturally be found. Coppice and shoreline, obviously, but this included utility wires, posts and docks etc for species that habitually use them to perch on or hunt from. However, the rule meant a complete embargo on feeder photos, however winsome a hummingbird might look as it sips sugar water. We extended the principle to include a ban on luring birds into camera-shot with seed or corn trails; and similar ruses beyond the simple whistles and pishes that anyone might use to tempt a bird out of deep cover.

Cuban Emerald coming in to land… and feedingCuban Emerald, Delphi, Abaco (Peter Mantle) 1 Cuban Emerald, Delphi, Abaco (Peter Mantle) 2

The Delphi club is the perfect location for an enviably varied number of species. Its remoteness down a one-mile drive from the Highway, with pine forest giving way to luxuriant coppice, ensures minimal disturbance for the birds including a number of rarer species.  Delphi Club Rolling Harbour Abaco Aerial view

The one-mile white sand curve of the beach sees many shorebirds and seabirds in all seasons. The gardens attract both the usual suspects and less common birds. The building, too, has its resident West Indian Woodpeckers in two nesting boxes under the eaves, thoughtfully provided to discourage the Club’s woodwork from exploratory drilling.

Mr and Mrs Black-faced GrassquitBlack-faced Grassquit (m) Delphi, Abaco (Keith Salvesen) Black-faced Grassquit (f) Delphi, Abaco (Keith Salvesen)

There are a number of seed and sugar water feeders around the place, and bird baths too. It’s a long time since I featured a collection of ‘tame’ birds. This post shows a few of the species that have made Delphi their home.

Mr and Mrs Greater Antillean BullfinchGreater Antillean Bullfinch (m), Delphi, Abaco (Keith Salvesen)Great Antillean Bullfinch. Delphi, Abaco (Keith Salvesen)

Mr and Mrs Painted BuntingPainted Bunting, Delphi, Abaco (Keith Salvesen)

Bananaquit: the curved beak makes it easy to use the hummer feeder (see above)Bananaquit (f) Delphi, Abaco (Keith Salvesen)

A Gray Catbird takes a drink… and a bathGray Catbird, Delphi, Abaco (Keith Salvesen)Gray Catbird, Delphi, Abaco (Keith Salvesen)

Adaptive behaviour from a W I Woodpecker – that long tongue is perfect for the jobWest Indian Woodpecker, Delphi, Abaco (Keith Salvesen)

The turkey vulture takes priority over all smaller birds…Turkey Vulture, Delphi, Abaco (Keith Salvesen)

A red-legged thrush enjoys picking up the seed shrapnel off the ground…Red-legged Thrush Abaco 7

As do rose-breasted grosbeaks and indigo buntingsIndigo Bunting & Grosbeaks, Delphi, Abaco ©C StahalaRose-breasted Grosbeak

Meanwhile, a yellow-crowned night heron takes a drink from the poolYellow-crowned Night Heron, Abaco 9

Credits: all photos RH except aerial shot of Delphi, Peter Brown; the hummers, Peter Mantle; and the buntings / grosbeaks, PM and Caroline Stahala…

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15 thoughts on “FEEDER BIRDS AT THE DELPHI CLUB, ABACO

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  9. wow, these are some great birds and great photos, RH. I am glad you could express them here, and of course I understand the parameters that have to be put in place. Red-legged thrush is astounding, and I always enjoy the painted buntings (nice w.both genders), not to be outdone by the Greater Antillean Bullfinch.

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