A FROG CALLED TOAD: NEW AMPHIBIAN SPECIES FOR ABACO


Eastern narrow-mouthed toad (Todd Pearson / ABSCI)

A FROG CALLED TOAD: NEW AMPHIBIAN SPECIES FOR ABACO

Welcome to the wonderful world of the tiny Eastern narrow-mouthed toad. This non-native species has just been discovered on Abaco and formally identified. It looks like a toad. It’s called a toad. It’s actually a frog. There’s a song from the ’60s (dread decade) called ‘Walkin’ my cat named dog…’. But no one has come up with ‘Check out my frog named toad’. Yet.

Eastern narrow-mouthed toad (Sean Giery ABSCI)

THE FIRST EVIDENCE ON ABACO

A year ago, Sean Giery reported on the excellent ABACO SCIENTIST website that he had heard the unmistakeable (to him) mating call of Eastern narrow-mouthed toads Gastrophryne carolinensis in the Marsh Harbour area, Abaco. Denizens of south-eastern US, the species had previously only been recorded in the Bahamas on Grand Bahama and New Providence.

Sean estimated that he heard several dozen of these tiny 2.5cm frogs, suggesting a well-established population. A veritable Frog Chorus.** However, he wasn’t able to obtain a specimen, so his identification was by sound alone – vividly described as “like a bleating lamb with a stuffy nose”. You can read the full article from last May HERE.

Eastern narrow-mouthed toad (P. Coin / ABSCI)

THE FIRST SPECIMEN IS FOUND 

In a further article one year later HERE, Sean relates how he was called to the home of alert student Donte Richard, who had remembered the original post. This was in a different area of MH, suggesting a spread of population. Others had reported the distinctive bleating calls as well. Identification of the specimen frog was made by researchers at the Frank Kenyon Centre, Friends of the Environment, and confirms a new addition to Abaco’s vertebrate fauna.

The evidential specimenEastern narrow-mouthed toad (ex Brian Kakuk)

WHERE WERE THEY FOUND?

ENM Toad Map MH

MIGHT THEY BE HARMFUL? 

Sean writes: “With Abaco added to the list of islands we see a distribution pattern that echoes another recent invader (the corn snake). Perhaps they share a similar route of entry? Whether or not the narrow-mouthed toad poses any real threat to Abaco’s native flora and fauna is unknown. However, given their diet of small invertebrates (ants, mites, termites), it seems unlikely that they could pose any substantial risk. That said, who knows?”

WHAT DO THEY LOOK LIKE WITH NO CLOTHES ON?
Tidelands Toad Skelly 2

CAN I BUY ONE AS A PET?

Yes, by all means you can. But they are remarkably expensive for a 2.5cm creature. ‘Urban Jungle Reptile’ sells them for $80 each. You might need a pair. But you’d be better off hanging round Marsh Harbour in May with a small bucket and spade. And they are useless for taking on walks. You’d be far better off with the cat named dog…

“My name is Freddie and I am for sale to a good non-amphibian-eating home”Narrow-mouthed frog (Urban Jungle Reptile)

**COMPLETELY THE WRONG SORT OF FROG CHORUS
CREDITS: foremost to Sean Giery / ABSCI for use permission for photo use and info; Todd Pierson (header), Sean (2, map 5), P.Coin (3); Brian Kakuk for posting the specimen initial shot (4); Tidelands Nature Center for the terrific skeleton photo taken at the Smithsonian (6); Urban Jungle Reptile ad (7).
DISCREDITS: Paul McCartney for his ill-advised foray into amphibian-based songwriting, a close second to David Bowie’s ‘Laughing Gnome’ for star career low points. Some might say.

7 thoughts on “A FROG CALLED TOAD: NEW AMPHIBIAN SPECIES FOR ABACO

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  3. I very much enjoyed this RH and considered playing it to the tadpoles in the tubs around our pond. They hatched from the spawn in mid April but still no sign of free swimmers (with legs) or froglets, though certainly getting bigger (i feed them alot)! Perhaps this will persuade them it’s time to grow up and join the frog chorus! Then I can have my tubs back! 😉

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    • Oh dear, don’t get Macca’s Frog Chorus turn into an earworm for you… nor for your tadpoles! BTW I got your bee book and think it is wonderful. Very informative and easily assimilated for the reader. We have bees in our roof in Dorset, so I must consult it for advice… The hive is inaccessible without scaffolding, a builder and tile etc removal. Oh dear! RH

      Liked by 1 person

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