ONE ROYAL BABY DESERVES… AN ABACO ROYAL TERN


Royal Tern Crowned

ONE ROYAL BABY DESERVES… AN ABACO ROYAL TERN

I posted briefly about ROYAL TERNS (Thalasseus maximus) on the Abaco Marls earlier this year HERE. Yesterday’s news from the Lindo Wing (anti-Monarchists look away now) surely justifies a few more photos of these fine and noble seabirds. Everyone else is using the event to sell newspapers / magazines / products (‘Royal’ Baby Lotion – so gentle, so soft – fit for a future King’s delicate…’ etc etc). If there’s a cheerful bandwagon passing, why not just hop on? I’ll skip the info about the range and nesting arrangements of these birds and show some them in all their glory, posing in the sunshine on a dead tree way out in the Abaco Marls.

Royal Terns Abaco (2) 4Royal Terns Abaco (2) 6 Royal Terns Abaco (2) 5 Royal Terns Abaco (2) 3 Royal Terns Abaco (2) 2 Royal Terns Abaco (2) 1PS No terns were hurt trying to get the yellow crown to fit one of them. In fact, they rather enjoyed it…

ONE GOOD (ROYAL) TERN ON THE ABACO MARLS…


ONE GOOD TERN ON THE ABACO MARLS…4

ONE GOOD (ROYAL) TERN ON THE ABACO MARLS…

Royal Tern, Abaco, Bahamas (Marls) 1…deserves another…Royal Tern, Abaco, Bahamas (Marls) 2…and a few more besides…Royal Tern, Abaco, Bahamas (Marls) 3

We passed these fine Royal Terns during the boat ride ride out to the bonefishing grounds of the Abaco Marls. The single dead tree lay alone in a vast expanse of open water near the mangrove swamps, providing a perfect perch and vantage point for the birds. Their positioning on the tree suggested a distinct “pecking order”, which turned out to be literally true. The terns were unembarrassed by our presence, but at one stage they all took off and circled lazily round once before settling back on the tree. Those that tried to take a higher perch were aggressively treated by the original occupant. In the end, things settled down much as before. However, one disappointed claimant to promotion was dispossessed of the main trunk entirely. He ended up, uncomfortable and huffy, on a small stump facing the opposite way to the rest of the birds – perhaps from wounded dignity, or to make his feelings known through body language….Royal Tern (Sterna maxima), Abaco Marls, Bahamas 5

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