BLACK DURGON: A TRIGGERFISH OF DISTINCTION


Black Durgon Triggerfish (Melinda Riger / Grand Bahama Scuba)

BLACK DURGON: A TRIGGERFISH OF DISTINCTION

The Black Durgon (Black Triggerfish) seems to be a fairly rare triggerfish in Bahamas waters. I say that not because I know, but because there is very little mention of them in a Bahamas context. In fact, the (not especially profound) research I have done suggests it is not (originally?) really native to the Bahamas region at all. Correction of this impression welcome!

Black Durgon Triggerfish (Melinda Riger / Grand Bahama Scuba)

These fish have the ability to change colour, according to their surroundings. Mostly, they seem completely black. However they have intricate blue markings to the head, and regular patterning on their flanks that resembles the sort of thing one idly doodles during a long and less then attention-holding phone call (or the ‘hold music’) – see Header Image. They also have dramatic pale stripes where their fins join the body.

Black Durgon Triggerfish (Getty Images)

These fish have a varied diet that includes small fish, squid and shrimps, with side-helpings of algae, zooplankton and marine plants. And…

FUN FACT (REALLY!)

The Black Durgon has been studied, of course. One piece of research discovered that they… erm… ingested the feces and vomit of a species of dolphin. Other reef fish in the area did so too, but the Black Durgon was much the keenest on this distinctive  diet. So these are ‘offal-eating’ fish… and welcome to it. Here’s a short video to take your mind off it all…

I’d be interested to hear from anyone who has encountered these fish in Abaco waters. I ought to look further into their prevalence. Maybe they just don’t get much publicity. They need a new agent.

Black Durgon Triggerfish (Melinda Riger / Grand Bahama Scuba)Credits: Photos by Melinda Riger / Grand Bahama Scuba except #3, Getty Images; Kwik-Viddy, Cassandra-Tel; inadequate research, Author